Authors: Anna Kolotova & Zhao Wenbin*

Since the Soviet Union was disintegrated in late 1991, people are always puzzled by the fact that China and Russia have come to be so rapidly and closely that they have forged the entente. In retrospect, Joseph Nye Jr. warned 17 years ago, it would take very clumsy American policy and behavior to drive China and Russia more fully into each other’s arms.

Published in East Asia

Late September, the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Embassies accredited to the Russian Federation celebrated the 37th Anniversary of SADC at the Korston hotel in southern Moscow.

Published in Africa

With more such projects in the pipeline at least in Asia, China has opened its first ever over sees military base on October 31 in African country of Djibouti. 

Published in Defense

In the shadowy world of covert proxy wars, Iran is taking centre stage, both as a target and a player. A series of incidents involving Iranian ethnic and religious minorities raise the spectre of the United States and Saudi Arabia seeking to destabilize the Islamic republic.

Published in Middle East

With the US President Donald Trump’s decertification of Iran nuclear deal, the prospect of peace and stability in the Middle East appears to be a distant dream. Largely seen as dangerously irresponsible act,

Published in Middle East

European leaders have clearly set themselves apart from the United States and the administration of President Donald J. Trump in relation to the 2015 Iran Nuclear Deal. They view the deal—also known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA)—as a success for non-proliferation and international security. In contrast, the current US Government has criticised the deal for failing to address non-nuclear issues, notably Iran’s continuing ballistic missile development, which the USA has long viewed as both a regional and a global threat.

Published in Defense

There are three possible scenarios of war in the context of North Korea rivalry with the US.

Published in East Asia

When, in 1972, Nixon pointed out to Mao Zedong that "the Chinese President changed the world", Mao just answered "no, only something on the outskirts of Beijing." In the mind of the Chinese President, a Taoist poet, that was the sense of the natural centrality of the "Middle Empire" compared to the First World (the United States and the USSR, namely "the barbarians of the North"), to the Second World (namely the  servants of either power) and to the Third World, the region that was bound to be represented and dominated by China.

Published in East Asia
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