T
he U.S. Treasury Department and Legislature are not doing average Americans any favors by blacklisting, alienating, and sanctioning other oil/gas-rich, wealthy nations in Eurasia having burgeoning economies at the behest of their International Central Banker masters.

Published in Economy

I
n a continuation of the theater of the absurd, all 100 U.S. senators were driven to the White House to listen to a top-secret intelligence briefing on North Korea. North Korea now has missiles capable of reaching Hawaii and will soon be able to extend its reach to California.

Published in Americas

A
mong the fulcrum points of contemporary international affairs, the relationship between China and the more than fifty countries that make up Africa is among the most closely watched. Critics and defenders alike cannot say enough about Beijing’s ties with the mysterious continent.

Published in Africa

T
he Indian decision to move from non-alignment policy to the multi-alignment policy in the 21st Century, where it plans to maintain a series of relationships, in different configurations, with a variety of countries for different purposes, has come handy for India’s economic and political growth.

Published in South Asia

A
t the outset it should be made clear that none of the nuclear nations is eager to achieve total denuclearization and disarmament and none wants to dismantle its own nuclear arsenals after having spent so much hard resources on their development and tests. But America does not want those countries that do not obey the Pentagon to have nukes as deterrence.

Published in East Asia

T
otal world military expenditure rose to $1686 billion in 2016, an increase of 0.4 per cent in real terms from 2015, according to new figures from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). Military spending in North America saw its first annual increase since 2010, while spending in Western Europe grew for the second consecutive year.

Published in Defense

T
he war on terror, perhaps like the cold war in the latter half of the twentieth century, is a defining feature of the current age of international relations. As an effort to combat terrorism on an international scale, it was always perhaps bound to produce outcomes both intended and unintended. One of these, I argue, is the (enhanced) alienation of the US in Africa after 2001/2002; something which I argue in turn opened a vacuum which China quickly came to fill on the continent.

Published in East Asia

W
hy does North Korea want to currently reach such a nuclear threshold as to threaten Japan, South Korea, the Southern Asian seas and, obviously, the US bases in the Pacific, as well as the North American mainland?

Published in East Asia
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