It is encouraging to see that the United Nations Security Council is beginning to acknowledge the transboundary dimensions of fragility and conflict, as demonstrated by its newly launched Report of the Secretary-General on the situation in the Lake Chad Basin region.

Published in Africa

At the crumbling Bell Pottinger, shock must still be setting in. Less than two years ago after the British PR firm agreed to a £100,000 per month contract with South Africa’s well-connected and widely despised Gupta business empire, the company is collapsing as its reputation for representing the worst of the worst catches up with it.

Published in Africa

Investing in women and girls must be central to global efforts towards sustainable peace and development in both Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the United Nations deputy chief said today.

Published in Africa

Welcome to the second issue of the inaugural year of the Journal of Rising Powers. In our first issue, we focused a great diversity of issues and articles around two anchoring pieces that dealt with the South China Sea conflict, which was front and center across most global media outlets at the time.

Published in Diplomacy

For four decades since 1949, Chinese government vowed not to send a single soldier abroad during the peacetime. This statement sounds credible because the leadership in Beijing has followed the tenet of “never becoming a superpower”. Yet, China has been changed with the change of time after the collapse of the former Soviet Union. In 1992 Chinese leaders agreed to send its military detachments abroad as peace-keeping mission if it is endorsed by the United Nations. Since then, China has become the largest peace-keeping troops-provider among the P-5 of the UN Security Council.

Published in East Asia

African countries are in a developmental conundrum; they have seen economic reversals in the wake (and arguably because) of the World Bank and yet African countries, at least for the foreseeable future, need the World Bank – owing to a paucity of alternative lenders in the present. In its assessment of the outcomes of World Bank involvement in Africa’s development, this paper emerges with a mixed picture.

Published in Africa

Both Chirac and Sarkozy had five minutes to leave power, while François Hollande could even have five months to do so. In fact, at the time, eight Frenchmen out of ten approved his decision not to run for another term. As you may recall, part of President Hollande’s establishment did not accept automatically to lend a hand to Manuel Valls, the Prime Minister who wanted to join the "two Lefts", the one resulting from Hamon’s  proposals for the primary election - a so-called gauche de la tradition -  and the one which was being shaped around Macron, with whom Valls had nothing in common at political level.

Published in Europe

Written by Anis Bajrektarevic and Giuliano Luongo

“For the past few centuries, Africa lived fear but dreamt a hope of Europeans …From WWI to www.” In this one short statement is the essence of the 6th book on geopolitics of prof. Anis Bajrektarevic: ‘Europe and Africa’ just released by the US publisher NOVA. This time professor is co-signing book with his junior researcher from Italy, Guliano Luongo, who is a Director of Africanistic studies at the Rome-based Institute for Geopolitics (IsAG).

Published in Africa
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