T
rump’s visits to Russia date back to 1987, the times of Mikhail Gorbachev’s perestroika reform program, when he paid three visits to the country in search of real estate deals. Those deals never materialized.

F
or five weeks now we all have been observing, mystified and incredulous, the spectacle of a deranged president and his administration, whom I have dubbed “The Caligula Presidency,” ready to “deconstruct” the world structure that has governed the Western world for seventy years or so after World War II. The very survival of democracy seems at stake. Perhaps it’s time to make a preliminary assessment and ask ourselves what do we really know for sure by now.

I
t is quite puzzling to reflect on the fact that both in Moscow and Washington the reaction to ambassador Kislyak’s imbroglios are exactly the same, at least at first sight. Both governments are both trying to minimize the importance of the revelations: it is a witch hunt fueled by fake news. It is all motivated by resentful Democrats and the liberal media who have not resigned themselves to having lost an election, they claim.

T
he latest scandal within the Trump Administration is that of the double meetings of the Attorney General Jeff Sessions with the Russian ambassador during the election while he was a campaign surrogate for Donald Trump. He failed to disclose those meetings to Congress during his confirmation hearing.

A
s it was to be expected, President Trump has characterized the first military aid he ordered, which turned deadly for a US seal Ryan Owens, and resulted in injury to a number of other Americans and a number of Yemen civilians, including children, as “a great success.”

W
e don’t have all the details yet, but the broad outlines of Trump’s Budget Plan have already surfaced. As it was to be expected it enlarges the pie for the rich, for the military, for corporations, and shrinks it for the poor and the underprivileged.

A
ides to President Trump have leaked that he often looks unfocused and unhinged. He yells like a madman when he gets information he does not much like, or when the level of adulation is not deemed adequate. “We walk on eggshells,” one aide says. “The slightest little thing can set him off.”

R
ecently a Fox News program featured a Swedish defense and national security advisor, Nils Buildt, interviewed by Bill O’Reiley. As it turns out, Builtd is unknown to any military and foreign affairs officials in Sweden. Security experts in Sweden have revealed that he isn’t a familiar figure in their ranks in that country.

T
he latest rant by Donald Trump against the media and its “fake news” came at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday the 24th of February. He called the media “dishonest” because allegedly it falsifies stories about his administration by made-up sources.

W
hy has Trump chosen so many billionaires for his Cabinet positions? The answer to that question was given a few days ago at the Conservative Political Action Conference by one of his most influential aide, Steve Bannon. He informed us that those appointments were made not for the purpose of governing but for that of “deconstructing” the administrative state. In more prosaic terms, for the purpose of destroying it.

Page 8 of 11

ABOUT MD

Modern Diplomacy is an invaluable platform for assessing and evaluating complex international issues that are often outside the boundaries of mainstream Western media and academia. We provide impartial and unbiased qualitative analysis in the form of political commentary, policy inquiry, in-depth interviews, special reports, and commissioned research.

 

MD Newsletter

 
Top