A
fter 100 days of Trump presidency the question arises: has it begun to undermine some fundamental norms of American democracy and tradition?

D
onald Trump is unlikely to finish his first term as President, according to the leading Democrat on the committee, Senator Mark Warner, looking into alleged Russian interference in the US election, and former Labor Secretary Robert Reich. They put the odds at two to one.

J
ust as with an eight year old juvenile, any excuse is good to shift the blame. The latest antic by president Trump is that he has blamed the US constitution for the problems of his first 100 days in office. He has directly called the system of checks and balances on power to prevent abuses, “archaic.”

F
reelance journalist Mike Cernovich and Cassandra Fairbanks, a reporter for Russian news outlet Sputnik, posed for a picture behind the podium in the White House briefing room where they can be seen making a hand sign that can be used to signify “white power.” The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has characterizes the symbol as a “racist hand sign.”

R
eaders who may have been following my daily column The Caligula Presidency, will have noticed that it is meant as a satire of sorts, tinged with humor, an attempt of last resort, so to speak, to place some rationale in a confusing and dangerous political situation.

A
recent new Gallup poll strongly suggests that an increasing number of Americans just don’t believe Trump’s spin about his presidency anymore. It finds that only 45 percent of Americans think Trump keeps his promises, down from 62 percent in February, an astonishing slide of 17 points:

D
iva Maslenjak faced summary deportation when it emerged she lied about her husband's service in a Bosnian Serb military unit when securing US citizenship in 2007. She arrived in the United States as a refugee in 1999, fleeing persecution as a Serb living in Bosnia. She claimed her husband had never served in the army, but this was proven to be false and she was deported.

E
normous majorities of Trump’s voters believe the news media regularly publishes false stories. Even bigger majorities of them believe the news media’s falsehoods are a bigger problem than the Trump administration’s falsehoods are, while only small fractions think the administration lies regularly.

D
onald Trump is very proud of the fact that, as a business man, he knows how to negotiate and make deals. But the crucial logical question is this: how well does he know what he is negotiating?

Franklin D. Roosevelt led the way in defining the role or the President as leader of his party. By setting forth a clear thematic and legislative agenda, Roosevelt gave congressional Democrats direction as they set forth to combat the Great Depression. Their successes established the “100 days” benchmark that has now become the standard by which new presidents are judged.

Page 2 of 11

ABOUT MD

Modern Diplomacy is an invaluable platform for assessing and evaluating complex international issues that are often outside the boundaries of mainstream Western media and academia. We provide impartial and unbiased qualitative analysis in the form of political commentary, policy inquiry, in-depth interviews, special reports, and commissioned research.

 

MD Newsletter

 
Top