The changing face of global adversity in the arena of international law has had a monumental impact on international legal jurisprudence. One of the branches that have predominantly developed is international criminal law albeit the involvement of global super powers has eluded the system.

The ICJ Elections 2017 undoubtedly represented a historic moment in International Relations. For the first time in history, the United Kingdom, P2 of the UNSC, has lost its seat in the International Court of Justice since its establishment in 1946. International media describes this as a true reflection of the changing global order and a huge diplomatic loss not only for Britain but also for the privileged bloc in the United Nations.

The ongoing UNFCCC Negotiations at COP 23 in Bonn, Germany shows increasing evidence of Trump’s intention to withdraw from the historic Paris Agreement signed by the US under President Obama’s leadership in 2015. The Paris Agreement is one of the fastest multilateral treaties in international law to have been signed and ratified by almost all nations.

The refugees in the present vicious visage want to stand to reason within the bounds of possibility by holding the scales at the odds being in favour etched in the feast of reason and the flow of soul so that they could come out of the horns of a dilemma.

The October-November 2017 are the delineating and defining months that present a constitutional moment in the pilgrimage of human rights when some human rights bodies of global and regional visage will sit in judgement at Geneva in Switzerland to assess the degree of States’ compliance with their human rights obligations through the States’ reports, civil society groups’ submissions, country visits, stakeholders’ hearings, webinars, individual representations and conference presentations.

Worldwide, climate change is already affecting directly and indirectly the agricultural productivity and ecology of some organisms because of changing patterns in crop production, livestock intensification, changing rainfall patterns, increased drought and flooding, and the geographical redistribution of pests and diseases, as well as altering the transport pathways of chemical contaminants.

(Reflection on text: Privacy i(n)t context of 18 April 2016, www.moderndiplomacy.eu)

While there was a surge of media analyses more then one and a half year ago, when the European Court of Human Rights (“the Court“)  found no violation of the right to respect for privacy for monitoring Yahoo account of employee[1], earlier in September 2017 the story unfolded completely otherwise.

As the world remains shocked at the atrocities committed against civilians in the northern Rakhine state, Myanmar government has once again blocked all aid agencies from delivering vital supplies of food, water, and medicine to thousands of civilians trapped in military campaign zone.

International Law has traditionally been a Western and modern discipline, but it is now a humongous and homogeneous bifurcate of scholarship that has since its establishment been traversing the untrodden trails of cognitive rumination which has expanded the perception and research crossbars.

17th August, 2017 will go down in history as a momentous day in Transitional Justice. On this day Trial Chamber VIII of the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued a reparations order in the case of The Prosecutor v. Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi holding Mali Isalmist militant Al Mahdi liable for 2.7 million euros in expenses for individual and collective reparations for destruction of cultural property in Timbuktu, Mali, the second time in the history of the Court where orders for reparations have been made, the first being in Germain Katanga’s case.

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