The word on the street in Afghanistan is that the United States created DAESH to be a problem for Russia, China, and Iran. While it would not be the first time the US funded, trained, or invented militarized extremism in the name of great power politics, the whole truth of this statement is far-fetched.

Between 250.000 and 300.000 is estimated number of child soldiers in the past year based on United Nations (UN) report from June this year.

Thirty years after the Convention against Torture has been introduced, the world has been exposed to a damning report on CIA interrogation revealing US government support for torture.

Russian President Putin engaged in a bit of saber rattling when he announced that Russia would field more than 40 new intercontinental ballistic missiles this year. Most news services interpreted the statement as a riposte to NATO’s announcement that it would pre-position heavy armored equipment in NATO’s Baltic members so as to deter Russian poaching.

While China has accepted human security as a new framework to study modern security challenges, it has been very busy trying to show how the implications of human security can be intrusive and even invasive of state sovereignty.

As I have explained before, geopolitics can have a wide array of meanings and concepts. However, what about when we seek to apply geopolitics in the real world?

So the United States Senate released its report highlighting extreme and supposedly ‘abhorrent’ techniques used on terrorist targets after 9/11 to glean greater intelligence and information.

Social movements are usually understood as a positive aspect of democracy and international community takes kindly to the use of media – especially social media – as means of raising awareness on topics discussed locally. By using it, people feel empowered and grassroots movements acquire a wider dimension and worldwide recognition, resulting in transitions that are most of times congruent to the Western concepts of free countries and peoples.

In 2013, Turkey hosted about a dozen conferences on cyber security and new technologies to counter cyber threats. In a speech at the end of the year, Colonel Cengiz Özteke, commander of the military General Staff's division for electronic systems and cyber defense, said that the Turkish military now considered cyber security as the country's "fifth force" [after land, air, sea, and apparently space].

“In 2008, Siddiqui (mother of 3) was arrested in Afghanistan with numerous bomb-making documents, specifically for chemical and biological weapons, for a "mass casualty attack" against potential targets like the Statue of Liberty and Brooklyn Bridge.

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