Both in the US and abroad, but especially abroad, there is a cliché making the rounds that goes something like this: Bernie Sanders would make a good president, he is certainly preferable to a Donald Trump, but he does not have a chance at winning the election. That kind of assessment can only be imputed to lack of attention to the latest polls and the details of American history. Let me explain.

As the Upper House voted for Ms Rousseff’s suspension, many questions were raised. The people, the media, opportunist and well-intentioned public figures, they all had something to say. Like any good scripted fiction, too, factors and variants were (and remain) many, generating a plethora of theories and, unfortunately, not much of productive debate.

"There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."-- Isaac Asimov

The political right in America has been flirting with dangerous ideas for a while now, particularly on issues involving immigrants and minorities. Lately, with the advent of Donald Trump as the leading presidential candidate in the Republican Party, the rhetoric has gotten particularly insane.

The space program that gave the United States much-deserved global recognition is looking very different today. Somewhat embarrassingly, the United States relies on the Atlas V rocket, powered by a Russian rocket engine, to transport crucial space satellite technology.

Over the years, the New York Billionaire property developer and TV personality famous for The Apprentice Donald Trump has made a number of remarks about running for US President.

A few days ago I came across a very interesting juxtaposition of two myths: one ancient and one modern which perfectly capture the current situation of the American Republican party. I’d like to share it with the MD readership.

Known for aggressive controversial rhetoric, Donald Trump, feeling sure of not just republican nomination but also becoming the next president of US super power to control the world, has made a major policy statement as he vowed to improve relations with Russia, China if elected US president. This is important as it is the only positive rhetoric he has made during his entire campaign for presidency.

“My foreign policy will always put the interests of the American people and American security above all else.” Donald Trump’s recent speech discussed his overall foreign policy theme. In the course of navigating through his speech, Donald Trump attempted to paint a new global direction for America that breaks away from the “rusting” trajectory of US foreign policy since the end of the Cold War.

As the 2016 elections enter the general election season, everyone will be anticipating who will be the next president. Before everyone moves onto the next administration, it is imperative to review the current president’s legacy for it will affect the next president’s agenda. While many reflections will be written about President Obama's tenure in office, a surfeit of these articles will tend to have a political bias in one way or another. Although attempting to discuss President Obama's 8 years will not be an easy nor concise feat, an attempt at an adumbrated and neutral discussion is provided below.

Why is the US so enamored of regime change? From coups (too many to count) in Latin America, to destroying democracy in 1950s Iran, to now and the present chaos in the Middle East. For anyone with basic knowledge of this history, the shameless hypocrisy accompanying the familiar trope of bringing 'freedom and democracy' appears callous and outrageous in light of all the human suffering and lives lost.

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