A
new report released today by the World Economic Forum, The Future of Electricity: New Technologies Transforming the Grid Edge, finds that adoption of new “grid-edge” technologies in OECD countries could bring more than $2.4 trillion of value creation for society and the industry over the next 10 years.

Authors: Sanjay Kumar Kar and Prajit Goswami

I
ndia is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. It had been growing at a rapid rate of 7 percent for the last 10 years. Further, it is expected to grow over 7% percent in the coming decade. To fuel projected economic growth and cater growing energy needs, India requires a lot of energy.

T
he process of growth and modernization in Brazil has been always described as an example to be followed by other developing countries. Nevertheless, the Brazilian ‘locomotive’ has stopped.

B
ehavioural evidence identifies barriers such as procrastination to be potential determinants for an environmentally-friendly behaviour (Grubb et al., 2009). In this line, McNamara & Grubb (2011) pinpoint that certain determinants can be influenced by the fact that environmental agents such as energy or recycling are abstract, invisible and intangible, which implies to be difficult to quantify them.

T
urkey demonstrates obvious and unique geostrategic significance for the Euro-Atlantic community and as an influential player at the center of Western attention. After the annexation of Crimea by Russia in 2014, the EU brought Turkey in as a major energy conduit for the international stage, increasing its significance and role in the energy sector.

T
he British Royal Navy was the largest and the most technically advanced naval force in the early half of the 20th century. It was the era of coal and oil has just started flowing in the markets. As coal was more readily available in the British Isles in Cardiff and Wales, most of the Royal Navy was coal fired. However, the advantages of a Navy fuelled by oil were beginning to be seen.

T
he stage is set. The world waits. There are murmurs and whispers. There are speculations and surmises. On 30th November OPEC and Non OPEC countries engage in a rendezvous in an effort to secure a deal. The whole world looks up to it. But a thwart seems to hang over.

A
ll seemed hunky-dory. The air was suffused with a sanguine current cascading through the markets and rallying up the prices touching a year-high of $53.73. Saudi Arabia aims to cut 2%-4% of total production and Russia also says that it will drain some 700,000 bpd. But the whole scenario was tinged with a shadow of askance.

Clearly, Russia and Turkey is fast moving to build a strong, if not anti- unilateral posture of USA, alliance to improve trade and economic and strategic alliance.

Authors: Urmila Rao* and Manish Vaid

One of the prime outcomes of the BRICS Summit 2016, (October 15-16, Goa, India) was setting up of three working groups by the Indian government; on counter-terrorism, cyber security and energy security. BRICS 2013 saw the issues of cyber security and terrorism discussed in the wake of US snooping revelations and terror-related violence in China. Summit 2013 saw the narrative revolve around countering cyber prying and terrorism through information sharing and following of best practices among Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS)., BRICS 2016 built up on that sentiment.

Page 2 of 4

ABOUT MD

Modern Diplomacy is an invaluable platform for assessing and evaluating complex international issues that are often outside the boundaries of mainstream Western media and academia. We provide impartial and unbiased qualitative analysis in the form of political commentary, policy inquiry, in-depth interviews, special reports, and commissioned research.

 

MD Newsletter

 
Top