T
he latest United Nations report on energy-efficiency technologies shows that low-carbon technologies apparently aid clean air, save water and cut land use, and could reduce 25 billion tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions and 17 million tonnes of particulates a year.

Authors: Ekaterina Klimenko & Camilla T.N. Sørensen

T
he Arctic is estimated to contain 30 per cent of the world’s undiscovered oil and gas reserves. Climate change has accelerated the melting of the Arctic ice, making these resources more available. This backgrounder looks at the status of Chinese–Russian energy cooperation in the Arctic.

C
harting data from 54 African countries, a new UN atlas reveals the continent's energy potential; revealing that investment in renewable energy would strengthen its economic advancement.

D
onald Trump’s primary focus might be making America “great again,” but it seems he is actively seeking mediocre or worse status when it comes to one area: cutting carbon emissions. The Mar-a-Lago summit between Trump and China’s Xi Jinping only served to drive this point home: whereas former American presidents used energy policy as a bridge to cooperation with Beijing, the new US leader flippantly left the global crisis he once wrote off as a “hoax” off the agenda.

W
hen it comes to achieving affordable, environmentally sustainable and secure energy systems, a group of small economies is quickly accelerating away from the rest of the world. The top 20 performers in the fifth annual Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report 2017 have achieved twice the average increase in their score compared to that of all other countries.

A
new report released today by the World Economic Forum, The Future of Electricity: New Technologies Transforming the Grid Edge, finds that adoption of new “grid-edge” technologies in OECD countries could bring more than $2.4 trillion of value creation for society and the industry over the next 10 years.

Authors: Sanjay Kumar Kar and Prajit Goswami

I
ndia is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. It had been growing at a rapid rate of 7 percent for the last 10 years. Further, it is expected to grow over 7% percent in the coming decade. To fuel projected economic growth and cater growing energy needs, India requires a lot of energy.

T
he process of growth and modernization in Brazil has been always described as an example to be followed by other developing countries. Nevertheless, the Brazilian ‘locomotive’ has stopped.

B
ehavioural evidence identifies barriers such as procrastination to be potential determinants for an environmentally-friendly behaviour (Grubb et al., 2009). In this line, McNamara & Grubb (2011) pinpoint that certain determinants can be influenced by the fact that environmental agents such as energy or recycling are abstract, invisible and intangible, which implies to be difficult to quantify them.

T
urkey demonstrates obvious and unique geostrategic significance for the Euro-Atlantic community and as an influential player at the center of Western attention. After the annexation of Crimea by Russia in 2014, the EU brought Turkey in as a major energy conduit for the international stage, increasing its significance and role in the energy sector.

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