T
he month of May 1998 transformed South Asian strategic dynamics when India and Pakistan demonstrated nuclear weapon capability in a tit for tat fashion. On 28 May 1998 Pakistan conducted a series of nuclear tests as a direct consequent of Indian nuclear detonation earlier that month. PM Nawaz Sharif stated, "If India had not exploded the bomb, Pakistan would not have done so. Once New Delhi did so, we had no choice because of public pressure."

I
slamabad’s decision to test nuclear weapons, was in order to achieve; the nuclear deterrence capability needed against the adversaries and confidence to be recognized as a major power in the international political system. Historically, the nuclear equation in South Asia was formed when the Canadian nuclear supplies were given for research and development to India, instead were diverted to make the weapons of mass destruction in 1974.

J
ammu Kashmir was a sovereign nation until India and Pakistan invaded and occupied it after their own independence from Great Britain. Both India and Pakistan wanted to expand their territories by annexing neighboring Jammu Kashmir and they have done with blessings from their colonial master UK.

T
oday Tamil Nadu, like in most of states, is undergoing serious crises. Communal flare-ups by the government and Hindutva parties is worst problem the nation is facing now.

R
aising alarm over the impact of internet and social media restrictions imposed by authorities in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir, United Nations human rights experts have called on the Government to protect the right to freedom of expression and to pursue an open and democratic dialogue to address the region's social and political conflicts.

T
he countries of South Asia are using the United States and EU’s deterrence model of building walls and fences along the border, to deter cross-border terrorism, migration and human trafficking. However, this deterrence strategy will ultimately fail, just like it did in the United States and EU.

T
urkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan visited India on an official two day trip from April 30 to May 1. President Erdogan embarked upon his India visit soon after he won the referendum to strengthen his presidency with more powers and he met Indian PM Narendra Modi on a variety of bilateral and multilateral issues. Both signed important bilateral agreements.

A
s the communities around the globe is globalizing, it would be disadvantageous for any country not to be proactive in seeking greater engagement with other countries, especially when it is a next door neighbour. Understanding this very reality, perhaps, the Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has been seeking out greater engagement with its next door neighbour Myanmar.

G
overnance in Tamil Nadu is standstill and in reverse gear with two factions fighting an almost street fight, making the life of common people miserable.

T
he Indian decision to move from non-alignment policy to the multi-alignment policy in the 21st Century, where it plans to maintain a series of relationships, in different configurations, with a variety of countries for different purposes, has come handy for India’s economic and political growth.

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