While the overall number of nuclear weapons in the world continues to decline, none of the nuclear weapon-possessing states are prepared to give up their nuclear arsenals for the foreseeable future.

Surprisingly, but despite the tough political confrontation two world superpowers: the US and Russia have much in common. They very often behave the same way. This is particularly evident in political and military spheres. Their main common feature that usually threatens the smaller states is absolute autonomy in their actions while achieving the status of "superstate".

The operations carried out by Inherent Resolve, the complex US-led coalition in Syria, had been announced as early as April 1, 2016 by the Head of PYD Kurdish Joint Forces, Salih Muslim. Currently Salih Muslim is the co-President of the Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD), which has long been managing power in the semi-autonomous Kurdish region of Rojava, in Northern Syria.

Authors: Dr. Matthew Crosston & Troy Baxter

Russia’s history as a nuclear state is extensive and well-documented. It was the second country in the world to acquire nuclear weapons (after the US) and since that point it has been the world leader in stockpiled nuclear weapons. The only other nation to remain in close contention was the US and it was estimated to have some 10,000 fewer nuclear warheads than Russia at each nation’s respective stockpiling peak. Russia has historically placed a significant emphasis on nuclear power and nuclear deterrence as a primary deterrent strategy since it first acquired the capability.

Amid the Panama leaks, Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif came up with an idea of addressing ‘Jalsas’ (rallies) in the whole country. Starting from KPK province, he is offering double numbers of laptops and millions of rupees for development projects to save his seat from tax payers’ money.

Of late, Sri Lankan president Sirisena has announced, apart from the reconciliation efforts with Tamils and other minorities in the island country, also a few other important decisions of his government. One is to make the country a big power which may be possible in the immediate future. Another, to fight corruption in the government and nation at large which is also not easy ambition considering that he really meant what he said.

In a report to Congress, the Pentagon on informed that China is on its way to modernize its nuclear forces in order to and bolster its strategic strike capabilities.

The big parade organized on May 9, 2016 to commemorate the 71st anniversary of the USSR victory in the Great Patriotic War - as the Soviet struggle against Nazi invaders was called - was an opportunity for Russia to display its new or recent Russian weapons and, above all, to understand their strategic use.

“If we don’t make a dollar but we change the world in a meaningful way... the returns are going to be the exhaust of that." Ashton Kutcher

Among all the imminent actions the recent meeting of Parrikar and US secretary of defense with their rapid and uneven defense procurement is something new in the box. This visit is seen very closely in certain quarters by neighboring countries because of their continuous military modernization and nuclear arms procurement stimulates massive and growing impacts-creating unrest in Asia in the past and may do so in future as well.

India’s global return to prominence, alongside China, has been an interesting and a fascinating story. Earlier dismissed and often disregarded, the rise and return of the two behemoths, first economically and then politically, has captured the world’s attention.

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