More than twenty years ago, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe adopted Recommendation 1247 (1994)[1]. The Recommendation read: “In view of their cultural links with Europe, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia would have the possibility of applying for membership provided they clearly indicate their will to be considered as part of Europe”.

No formal or international recognition of sovereignty, no peace and no solution in foreseeable future. The international importance of territory and the whole region leading to unsuccessful involvement of international organizations, neighboring countries and world powers is reality that describes Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.

Being a place where modern and traditional coexist, interact and collide, Azerbaijan’s capital, Baku, proves to be an alluring cultural intersection on the Caspian shore by portraying the ever developing art scene that give us an insight into the county’s aspirations for the 21st century.

In this series of articles, we intend to present an overview on the Caspian countries, their history, their changing politics and economy in order to offer a complete analysis on the late panorama in this part of the world.

Walcott, S. M. and Johnson, C. (eds.) (2013) Eurasian Corridors of Interconnection: From the South China to the Caspian Sea. 1st edn. United Kingdom: Routledge

Eurasian Corridors of Interconnection: From the South China to the Caspian Sea provides a comprehensive outlook on the Eurasian region set between the Caucasus countries and China.

25 years ago, the Russian historical empire melted down. Although often underreported, this also marked the end of alternative society in Europe. Collapse of the II world, made the 3rd way (of Yugoslavia and further, beyond Europe – globally, of the Nonaligned Movement) obsolete.

“These Chechens…They are like wolves coming down from the mountains… I am afraid they will come after me…”, the Turkish character of Vigo Mortensen’s Eastern Promises movie ushered.

Perhaps you've never traveled to southwestern Ohio. But you've probably heard of the Dayton accords, the 1995 agreement that ended the Bosnian war.

Alexander Borodai (allegedly a former high ranking officer in the Russian successor to the KGB, the FSB) has recently stood down as ‘Prime Minister’ of the self-proclaimed Donetsk Peoples Republic (DNR: Donets'ka Narodna Respublika).

Following famous words of my professor Anis Bajrektarevic that: “the Atlantic Europe is a political power-house (with the two of three European nuclear powers and two of five permanent members of the UN Security Council, P-5), Central Europe is an economic power-house, Russophone Europe is an energy power-house, Scandinavian Europe is all of that a bit, and Eastern Europe is none of it.”

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