Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaitė on March 17 attended a European Council meeting which focused on the EU's Annual Growth Survey and the progress of member states in implementing the European Commission's economic and social recommendations for 2015. One can not deny that the problems a number of EU countries caused by anti-Russian sanctions.

Everyone wants to help Ukraine but no one knows exactly how. Time is passing, nothing is changing. All tested methods of international aid suffered a defeat. Consultative, financial and military assistance was tried more than once.

There is an urgent need to change the political image of Lithuania. A disastrously untrue stereotype of the country has been formed today due both to objective and subjective reasons. Let see what foreigners may think about the country reading news about Lithuania.

One of the consequences of the geopolitical changes that has come to characterize modern civil society has been the surge in popularity of paramilitary units across Europe. This phenomenon is particularly observable in the Baltic States concerned about the rise of Russia's military activity.

A wonderfully informative, if also somewhat depressing, report has just come out from The Foreign Policy Centre, based in London, where the effort was made to understand why there seems to be a lack of transparency and accountability across Parliamentarian International Organizations as concerns recognizing and documenting and challenging human rights abuses across the Post-Soviet space, including the Greater Caspian region.*

High-level diplomats and military all over the world are making enormous efforts to prevent a new Cold War, to which relations between Russia and NATO are evolving at a breakneck pace.

The primary point of interest here is why Syrians are fleeing their nation and where they are going. The primary reason they are fleeing is relatively obvious: Syria is currently being torn apart by war and its citizens want to be free of the violence, destruction and general unrest.

It has been almost one year since the IV Caspian Summit in Astrakhan, Russia, where the presidents of the five Caspian states signed a political declaration that denied any foreign military presence in the Caspian Sea.

The European Union may have found itself deeper into a conflict than it had originally planned when it invited both Armenia and Azerbaijan into the Euronest.

Ideally located between George Washington University, my office at the Eastern Congo Initiative, and the White House is a $12 million mansion owned by the State Oil-Company of the Azerbaijan Republic (SOCAR).

Page 4 of 7

ABOUT MD

Modern Diplomacy is an invaluable platform for assessing and evaluating complex international issues that are often outside the boundaries of mainstream Western media and academia. We provide impartial and unbiased qualitative analysis in the form of political commentary, policy inquiry, in-depth interviews, special reports, and commissioned research.

 

MD Newsletter

 
Top