"The 70th anniversary of the United Nations is an opportunity to reflect – to look back on the UN’s history and take stock of its enduring achievements. It is also an opportunity to spotlight where the UN – and the international community as a whole – needs to redouble its efforts to meet current and future challenges across the three pillars of its work: peace and security, development, and human rights." - Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's message for UN70

The International Court is the judicial body that brings to justice individuals accused of violation of the international law. The idea to create the court arose after the end of the World War II and it is based on the principle: all persons, including high-ranking state officials, accused of committing serious international crimes must be punished.

On October 24th, 2015 the United Nations and its charter will be 70 years old. However, it was before October, more specifically on June 26th 1945 that the charter was signed by 50 of 51 original member countries.

A South African court banned the President of Sudan Omar Al-Bashir from leaving the country after he had come to attend the African Union Summit being held in Johannesburg earlier this week.

Fairness and equal opportunity are vital to rich and developing countries alike, warns Jan Vandemoortele, who was among the architects of the UN’s Millennium Development Goals

The United Nations, an organization of governments created in 1945 following World War II, was meant to foster international cooperation between members and prevent cycles of violence and bloodshed. Its leader is the secretary general of the organization. Currently the post is held by a Korean national, Ban Ki-moon, who assumed the post in 2007.

Current refugee-migrant flows (from Burma and Bangladesh toward Thailand and Malaysia and across the Mediterranean from Africa and the Middle East toward Europe) have highlighted the need to attack the root causes of such migration and refugee flows.

The Legal Status of the Caspian Sea- Current Challenges and Prospects for Future Development, Barbara Janusz- Pawletta (Springer- 2015- 176 pages)

“Is it possible for the Caspian Sea, which has become a bone of contention between the five bordering countries Russia, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan and Iran after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, to turn into an area of- literally speaking- fruitful cooperation in the legal sense?

This might be a tricky question to ask nowadays, but there are theories that help us understand better the role of emerging powers in the world today. Although are there only relatively simplistic definitions, it is understood that an emerging power is a country whose conquest of space in the international arena occurs gradually, through economic and political means.

Ms. Najiba Mustafayeva, PhD candidate in International Law, Expert at the Center for Strategic Studies (SAM) under the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, speaks exclusively to Modern Diplomacy and Dimitris Giannakopoulos, for the international security system and United Nations role on the protection of the global peace.

Page 4 of 6

ABOUT MD

Modern Diplomacy is an invaluable platform for assessing and evaluating complex international issues that are often outside the boundaries of mainstream Western media and academia. We provide impartial and unbiased qualitative analysis in the form of political commentary, policy inquiry, in-depth interviews, special reports, and commissioned research.

 

MD Newsletter

 
Top