Y
ou may have noticed lately that the popular slogan “everyone is entitled to their own opinion” has slowly evolved to “everyone is entitled to their own truth.” This is particularly evident among the very young, the millennials, so called, but it is not something brand new. In philosophy goes it goes by the name of Relativism or Humian empiricism and utilitarianism, as opposed to Kantian deontological universalism. Those two strands of epistemology and ethics within philosophy have a long and respectable history.

R
ecently we have been witnessing in the media a veritable plethora of news- articles regarding the Orthodox branch of Christianity (comprising some 300 millions or one eight per cent of the global total number of Christians). Some pundits of religion have called it a veritable propaganda offensive to popularize Orthodoxy around the world. What is going on? Is it mere propaganda, or what? To begin to understand this phenomenon one needs to review, even if cursorily, the record on the relationship religion/politics as experienced first in Europe and later globally.

2
5 years ago, the Greek Orthodox Church in Turkey chose Bartholomew I (Arhondonis) as its leader. This event was celebrated all over the world. On September 18-20, the "prayer for peace" ceremony took place in the city of Assisi. On this occasion, the Jewish, Anglican and Catholic leaders congratulated their Orthodox Christian counterpart. On October 22, the solemn church service was held in the Fener. All other Greek Orthodox Patriarchs sent letters of congratulations.

H
istory, as is often said, is written by the victors. Rarely have victors been found where violence does not also follow in their wake. Not only that, it is arguable that major history itself rarely excludes immense violence. Even when creative works do not reflect history accurately, violence is almost always projected in honorable displays and heightened to metaphorical significance.

“The unexamined life is not worth living”-Socrates “Is my self really mine?”-St. Augustine

W
e have heard much lately about the “world in turmoil,” or about a confused alienated relativistic Western society pursuing pleasure and economic wealth while misguidedly imagining that they by themselves will contribute to its overall well-being and happiness, and at the same time despairing of ever finding the true meaning of life, what Aristotle calls Eudaimonia, happiness, or its pursuit, as the US Constitution proclaims, properly understood as the “flourishing life,” a life that fulfills its nature and potential and achieves its destiny.

T
he extent to which violence is embedded in society means that uprooting it is everyone’s job, senior United Nations official said, lamenting that violence against women and girls continue to be a low priority on the international development agenda and urging more action – and more funding – to end the pandemic of such violence now, once and for all.

Micah 5:12: “And I will cut off sorceries from your hand, and you shall have no more tellers of fortunes”

T
he state of Holy Bible is a pivotal basis behind the curtain of mysterious witch trials in terms of identifying them in deep. Witchcrafts which were basically common in the American colonies such as Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Haven sparked the volcano of moral tensions amid XVII century in the colonies.

L
ife is beautiful to spend. It have the many moments which included sorrows, joys and also sometimes we feel the situations which we can't find that in which feel we are...? Happy or Sad...But these are the really precious moments or the assets of life.

Concerning the latest obscene lewd revelations of the dirty old man named Donald Trump eager to become our president, I wonder if anyone has observed a social phenomenon well known in Italy and other places. It is called cuckoldery, utilized as a socio-political weapon.

As a historic day for Christianity, Pope Francis on September 04 Sunday declared Mother Teresa of Kolkata, revered for her work among the poor, a Saint of the Catholic Church. "We declare and define Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be a Saint," the Pope said, to a roar from the thousands gathered at St. Peter's Square here, including many Indians who held or waved the Indian flag. "We enroll her among the Saints, decreeing that she is to be venerated as such by the whole Church. The Pope invoked the trinity: In the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit!"

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