“Under conditions of tyranny, it is far easier to act than to think” -Hannah Arendt

V
arious historians and cultural anthropologists have urged us lately not to conflate too easily Communism with Nazism. This admonition goes back to a book which appeared in 1945: Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism which analyzes these two major totalitarian movements of the 20th century, namely Nazism and Stalinism. The book did not appear in its English version (titled as The Burden of our Times) till 1951. It became a classic on the subject.

D
espite the bridge that Aquinas built between reason and faith, modern journalists who believe that religion is a non-rational retrograde activity to be avoided at any cost, are legions.

Text too are worldly in as much as they have a way of existing that even in the most rarefied form are always enmeshed in circumstances, time, place, and society” -Edward Said in The World, the Text and the Critic

E
dward Said, even 13 years after his untimely death, remains today a powerful, well-reasoned voice of the voiceless, as well as a courageous critic of cultural imperialism. His mind was like that of Leonardo: where others saw an abyss between East and West, he saw a bridge that needed to be constructed. His serene fair critique of cultures is very much needed as we weather the latest fierce storms in the Transatlantic dialogue and a resurgence of the Cold War.

I
t is the task of pundits and political science experts to elucidate, explain and untie our geo-political conundrums and knots, so to speak. It has become a veritable academic cottage industry whose father arguably is none other than Niccolo’ Machiavelli. But to judge even by only what can be empirically observed, it seems that the greater the effort of elucidation, the greater the confusion. This is a puzzling paradox which is sure to keep academics of all stripes up at night and very busy for the foreseeable future.

Impoverished is he who can predict economic trends but who does not well understand his own self.” ~ Christian Smith

T
here is great book which appeared way back in 2010. The author is the William R. Kenan, professor of sociology Christian Smith, who also directs the Center for the Study of Religion and Society and the Center for Social Research at Notre Dame University. His particular academic expertise is religion vis a vis modernity. The book’s title is What is a Person? Rethinking Humanity, Social Life and the Moral Good from the Person Up.

Y
ou may have noticed lately that the popular slogan “everyone is entitled to their own opinion” has slowly evolved to “everyone is entitled to their own truth.” This is particularly evident among the very young, the millennials, so called, but it is not something brand new. In philosophy goes it goes by the name of Relativism or Humian empiricism and utilitarianism, as opposed to Kantian deontological universalism. Those two strands of epistemology and ethics within philosophy have a long and respectable history.

R
ecently we have been witnessing in the media a veritable plethora of news- articles regarding the Orthodox branch of Christianity (comprising some 300 millions or one eight per cent of the global total number of Christians). Some pundits of religion have called it a veritable propaganda offensive to popularize Orthodoxy around the world. What is going on? Is it mere propaganda, or what? To begin to understand this phenomenon one needs to review, even if cursorily, the record on the relationship religion/politics as experienced first in Europe and later globally.

2
5 years ago, the Greek Orthodox Church in Turkey chose Bartholomew I (Arhondonis) as its leader. This event was celebrated all over the world. On September 18-20, the "prayer for peace" ceremony took place in the city of Assisi. On this occasion, the Jewish, Anglican and Catholic leaders congratulated their Orthodox Christian counterpart. On October 22, the solemn church service was held in the Fener. All other Greek Orthodox Patriarchs sent letters of congratulations.

H
istory, as is often said, is written by the victors. Rarely have victors been found where violence does not also follow in their wake. Not only that, it is arguable that major history itself rarely excludes immense violence. Even when creative works do not reflect history accurately, violence is almost always projected in honorable displays and heightened to metaphorical significance.

“The unexamined life is not worth living”-Socrates “Is my self really mine?”-St. Augustine

W
e have heard much lately about the “world in turmoil,” or about a confused alienated relativistic Western society pursuing pleasure and economic wealth while misguidedly imagining that they by themselves will contribute to its overall well-being and happiness, and at the same time despairing of ever finding the true meaning of life, what Aristotle calls Eudaimonia, happiness, or its pursuit, as the US Constitution proclaims, properly understood as the “flourishing life,” a life that fulfills its nature and potential and achieves its destiny.

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