W
ith new trends and directions in global business, African countries have to look to the Eurasian region as a huge market for exports as well as make efforts to consolidate and strengthen economic cooperation, says Tatiana Cheremnaya, the President of ANO "Center for Effective Development of Territories" and Head of the working group on public-private partnership "Business Union of Eurasia" in this wide-ranging interview.

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us…”- Opening paragraph from “A Tale of Two Cities”

I
n 1973, E.F. Schumacher wrote a book entitled Small Is Beautiful. The book was well reviewed and was read by many people concerned with the global ecological disaster, but perhaps it was a bit ahead of its time.

W
hile the intelligence of the average American to vote for Trump and have him elected as the head of the country is still questionable, here’s one bit of good that just might come out of this whole orange-haired mess! The man’s foreign agenda seems to be quite dubious especially his silence on African affairs, but if the man succeeds in delivering his local promises, people who borrowed student loans and rely on an income-based repayment plan to clear their debt might be looking at a favorable deal down the four years of his presidency.

F
ixed deposits are a popular financial instrument when it comes to investments over land, gold, or other property assets, thanks to one of the highest interest rate on Fixed Deposit. The amount of risk involved with a fixed deposit is almost negligible and makes for a better investment when compared to investing in other venues. The best fixed deposit rates in India and high returns on investment only add on to the popularity of a fixed deposit.

T
he world has always been an inquisitive olio of kaleidoscopic diplomacy. After the World War-1 we saw how nations toggled between alliances and camaraderie betwixt one another as globalization begun to spread its thousands of tentacles around the world. With the proliferation in technology, scarcity of resources and blurring of the boundaries the aforesaid trend has only gained more momentum and today we live in a world that is intricately connected.

I
ncreased integration into the global economy of the economies that comprise the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has made the region a more accessible market for trading goods than either the European Union or United States.

G
lobal innovation is soaring as the 2015 edition of a United Nations agency on intellectual property report reveals that 2.9 million patent applications lodged worldwide – a 7.8 per cent increase over the previous year.

R
ecording an almost four per cent increase over the same period last year, the first nine months of 2016 witnessed 956 million international tourists travelling to different parts of the world, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO).

W
orld attention was fully focused on US presidential poll as Republican Donald Trump was leading on November 08 as Indian premier Narendra Modi announced in the night on Indian TV channels about the state ban of currency notes, making life miserable for the people without enough money in hand.

T
he word “sustainable” has acquired many meanings in recent years. However, in essence, the word means “able to keep going” and it is with this meaning which it is here applied to organisations and individuals as well as to their physical, social and cultural environments.

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