Despite stresses in the global economy, China will avoid any sharp drop in growth, Premier Li Keqiang of China told more than 2,000 business, government and civil society leaders from over 90 countries participating in the opening session of the eighth World Economic Forum Annual Meeting of the New Champions.

The global economy has been performing moderately well, but the pace of expansion in the first half of 2014 has been surprisingly weak, panellists concluded at a session on the global economy on the first day of the eighth Annual Meeting of the New Champions in Tianjin, China, on 10-12 September.

Everywhere we remain un-free and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it. But we are delivered over to it in the worst possible way when we regard it as something neutral, for this conception of it, to which today we particularly like to do homage, makes us utterly blind to the essence of technology.
                                    --Martin Heidegger, “The Question Concerning Technology”

Public debt is a relatively complex concept that most current approaches agree to refer to the sum of debt whose obligation to repay falls on the government of a country[1]. According to the World Bank (WB)'s approach, public debt is understood as the liability of four main groups of institutions:

Not too long ago, the economic invincibility of the developed world seemed immovable. But then BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and now with the addition of South Africa becoming BRICS, are on the world stage as serious contenders.

Emerging markets will still lead global economic growth, said Min Zhu, Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), but there will continue to be challenges.

Food security remains at the top of the political agenda in China and other emerging and developing countries.

Mobile technology is disrupting all industries and sectors, and changing the way people interact among themselves and with service providers, said technology experts and entrepreneurs

Sometimes economies can't be fixed after decades of statist misdirection, and the people simply get up and go. Since the debt crisis of the 1980s, 10 million poor Mexicans—victims of a post-revolutionary policy that kept rural Mexicans trapped on government-owned collective farms—have migrated to the United States.

Egypt's unfixable economy will inexorably turn it into a failed state. Notwithstanding the existence of an educated, urbanized, and sophisticated class, Egypt remains an essentially pre-modern society with a 45% literacy rate and a dysfunctional higher education system unable to produce a competent labor pool to meet the demands of a globalized economy.

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