J
ust a week after his official installation at the White House, Donald J. Trump lashed out at China, accused of manipulating its currency to "win the globalization game", but also at Germany which, as the President of the new National Trade Council, Peter Navarro, said "is exploiting both its neighbours and the United States with the euro".

P
overty alleviation has implied an important goal for developing countries and policy-makers throughout the last century. Recently, organisations such as the United Nations and the World Bank have reported an increasing necessity for centring efforts on facing determinant factors of poverty growth in such countries.

T
he global rise of cities has been unprecedented. Every week, nearly 1.5 million people become urban dwellers. By 2050, the urban population will account for more than two-thirds of the world’s population.

B
usiness cycles are common phenomena in the countries’ economy, implying a puzzling pattern that behavioural economists try to study and forecast.

S
mall and medium-sized enterprises along the routes of the “One Belt, One Road” initiative – often referred to as the New Silk Road – can boost the GDP of their countries by 4% to 7% as a result of increased market access, a new World Economic Forum study finds. Lack of access to global markets is currently their main impediment to growth.

T
he World Economic Forum today issued a report proposing a shift in economic policy priorities to respond more effectively to the insecurity and inequality accompanying technological change and globalization. The Inclusive Growth and Development Report 2017 concludes that most countries are missing important opportunities to raise economic growth and reduce inequality at the same time because the growth model and measurement tools that have guided policymakers for decades require significant readjustment.

I
n light of the termination of the US dollar convertibility to gold (end of the Breton Woods exchange rate system, 1971-73), there has been reported a considerable rise in the short-term volatility of the relative price between countries—a dramatic mean-reverting, fluctuating behaviour.

I
t was the worst of times, it was the best of times.” Thus begins A Tale of Two Cities. Perhaps we are now living in such times, when the vision of a new social system beyond capitalism can finally be entertained if not realized. The inevitable question arises: what exactly needs to be done?

H
erodotus tells us that it was Croesus, King of Lydia, the land from which, according to Livy, the Etruscans came, who invented the minting of coins - hence currency - by impressing his seal on the electrum, a natural alloy of silver and gold. According to ancient history, it was a temporary stopgap.

W
hether one agrees with Donald Trump’s economic policies or not, the state of economy he will inherit needs to be clarified. A recent article by the Washington Post’s Catherine Rampell stated as one of her main theses that Trump will inherit a strong and vibrant economy. While other aspects of the article make interesting points, the premise upon which the article’s foundation lies upon is mistaken. The economy that is being handed to President-elect Trump is not in the most favorable conditions as claimed by the article, it is actually the contrary.

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