Earlier this month, over 40 African Union (AU) nations signed a binding agreement to curb piracy and other maritime crime on the continent’s coastlines. The meeting in Lomé, Tongo, drew 18 heads of state – considerably more than most African Union meetings – a fact that demonstrates the importance to African leaders of curbing piracy, illegal fishing, and other crime on Africa’s economically endangered coastlines. The deal will establish a maritime security fund, and is also meant to strengthen cooperation and communication between governments.

Despite conflicts and instability in parts, Africa’s fast growth and development, at least during the past decade, has attracted external countries mainly from Asian region, European Union (EU) and the United States. In this special interview, David Shinn, an Adjunct Professor in the Elliott School of International Affairs, a former U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia and Burkina Faso, and previously served as a Director of the Office of East African Affairs in Washington, explains some ways to engage Africa.

For more than two decades, Russia has been struggling to regain its Soviet-era economic influence, but such efforts have hit stumbling blocks which policy experts and Russian authorities themselves admittedly attributed to inadequate knowledge of investment and economic possibilities in Africa.

The municipality elections were held in South Africa on August 3 2016. The African National Congress (ANC) which had emerged from the post-apartheid regime in 1994 with an iron grip, for the first time since then, lost considerable support. The ANC lost in three important cities. They lost the capital city Pretoria. They also lost Nelson Mandela Bay metropolitan area in the Eastern cafe, which includes Port Elizabeth, to the Democratic Alliance. For close observers though, this did not come as a surprise at all.

Over the past two decades, Russia's efforts to regain its Soviet-era influence in Africa have achieved little success because "times have changed significantly, for example, a new economic and political environment, new emerging challenges, new competitive conditions and new bases for cooperation," according to Nataliya Zaiser, a Public Policy Advisor at Squire Patton Boggs Moscow office covering Russia, the Eurasian Union and Africa, and also the Chair (Head) of the Africa Business Initiative.

Falls in economic growth rates do not spell the end of the “Africa Rising” story, but rather provide an opportunity for countries on the continent to regroup, refocus and make themselves more resilient to external shocks, said Uhuru Kenyatta, President of Kenya, on the opening day of the 26th World Economic Forum on Africa, taking place for the first time in Kigali.

Let us start with what makes me unhappy comrades. This undiscovered bridge called language or rather mother tongue. The life of the artist, poet, writer who communicates the eternal heartbeat of the people. The working class experiment. Anticipatory nostalgia for the past.

They have a name. Millennial. Revolutionary. Comrade. Countryman. Youth. They have shamed us into thinking what was impossible before.

The rest of us are shamed by our silence or rather they are the reason we are filled with shock, fear, traumatized.

What the future holds for South Africa is more poverty, more polarization between the haves and the have nots if our leaders in government aren't younger and more or rather in touch with people from the rural countryside, and neighborhood communities at the grassroots level. The society that we live in today is dysfunctional to say the least.

On 22 January, just over 25 months after the start of the civil war in South Sudan, the scheduled formation of the Transitional Government of National Unity will be one of the first major milestones in the peace process.

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