On 1 August 2015, the Helsinki Final Act, the birth certificate of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) turned 40.

With global crisis, unemployment, dissatisfaction, poverty and intolerance has increased and with it also nationalism. Political parties with nationalist platforms are rising and gaining more support around the world and Europe is no exception.

The Greek debt crisis saga continues with no resolution in sight. As expected, the European leaders rejected a last-minute proposal by Alexis Tsipras, Prime Minister of Greece, requesting an extension of the bailout program that expired on 30th June and seeking a new €29.1 billion bailout package that could have covered country’s debt obligations over the next two years.

As the Greeks have rejected the EU “fixes” to their country fiscal crisis and Greece’s expulsion from the Eurozone appears imminent, there are political analysts who are now asserting that Putin is ready to reap the benefits of the crisis and that secretly he is already calling the shots. How plausible is such an analysis? Let’s see.

A freshly released IMF’s World Economic Outlook brings (yet again, for the sixth year in a row, and for the third time this year only) no comforting picture to anyone within the G-7, especially in the US and EU.

The bitter fight that has been raging between the European Union and Greece has now extended for five long months. With the referendum on July 6th it may all be mercifully put to an end.

Prof. Anis H. Bajrektarevic recently launched a book titled, “Europe of Sarajevo 100 Years Later: From WWI to www.” Only Prof. Anis, I think, can write a book of that title, just as he’s the only intellectual I know who argues passionately that Google is the Gulag of our time, the prison of the free mind.

According to the most optimistic comments, such as those who come from the German Chancellor and French President, Europe is a few days or hours before the completion of the agreement for settling the Greek problem.

Getting European societies on board is a sine qua non condition for any major reform in the EU. It is also evident that major reforms are necessary to guarantee Europe’s competitiveness and - in the long run probably – its very existence.

In Europe, significant changes occur. By main political causes, it seems that the issue of national identity conquers increasingly large part of the agenda in almost all countries of the Eurozone.

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