In a wake of refugee crisis in Europe and looking for its solutions fear of unknown customs, religions, people with their own culture and way of living, fear and negative perception of foreign regardless whether they are refugees or economic migrant in Europe is on the horizon and is increasing.

The European Union was born as a viable polity in the early 50s, a few years after World War II. Some scholars claim that seventy years is too short a span of time on which to construct a grand narrative.

The election of Jeremy Corbyn, for the leadership of the Labour, marks the most left turn into one of the most conservative party environments.

At the turn of the new millennium I joined the on-line dialogue and debate on “The Future of the European Union.” It was inaugurated by Tony Blair and the then President of the EU Council Romano Prodi.

I still remember when in the sixties and seventies the term “extra-communitarian” was banded about in the European political discourse. It designated all those who were non EU citizens.

In the following paper we shall discuss the link between age as a personal characteristic and the right to vote as one of, if not the most important fundamental political human right, which is inseparably linked to a democratic, plural state ruled by law.

What is genocide? According to the dictionary, it is the “murder of a whole group of people, especially a whole nation, race, or religious group”.

The hundreds of thousands of refugees, that come to Europe in order to survive from war and the hundreds of thousands of immigrants, who move from one European country to others, is expected to become the new major problem, which the European Union will jointly face.

In the ongoing Euro Zone drama, the sovereign debt held by Greece is the crux of the issue occupying centre stage. The economy of Greece has seen its debt-to-GDP ratio increase from around 120 per cent in 2010 to nearly 180 per cent today.

On 1 August 2015, the Helsinki Final Act, the birth certificate of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) turned 40.

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