I
n principle, Donald Trump thinks that the NATO and non-NATO US traditional allies are free riders, namely fully autonomous decision-makers which accept the US military support, but then do their own way, at least in foreign policy. Donald Trump does not want to pay billions of dollars to protect US friendly nations which, however, do not spend the amount required for their defense.

V
arious political science scholars have identified a striking resemblance between the Germany of the years before the rise of the Nazi Party (the years of the Weimar Republic) and the United States of today. The question has arisen: could what happened in Germany some 84 years ago happen now in the US?

N
ow that Donald Trump has been elected President of the United States of America, there are a lot of things he needs to do. He has seen firsthand the unseemly underbelly of the various Deep State actors that have fought tooth and nail to both undermine and character assassinate him, as well as destroy him personally and professionally.

O
h, my God, they did it" were the headlines of a European newspaper, echoing those of the Brexit. The journalist pundits and experts, with eggs all over their face, just as in the case of Brexit, are now busy in explaining what went wrong and in predicting what will go wrong in the future, stopping short of explaining why they got it wrong this time around.

S
hock! Disbelief! Total surprise! Those media (and politicians) who have in the preceding election campaign totally uncritically, but systematically supported Hillary Clinton, try by using such words to convince the public opinion (and themselves most probably) that the election of Donald Trump as the next American President is a total surprise (a mistake, almost). But – this is not how things really are. This is, simply, not true.

I
n America goes a proud boast, anyone can be president. Unfortunately, anyone often is. Instead of using the peace dividend from the accord with the Soviet Union to restore infrastructure and improve the lives of the people, a bill for $5 trillion from all the wars awaits.

R
epublican Donald Trump, a novice in US national politics, has defeated former state secretary and experienced Democratic politician Hillary Clinton in the US election, and will become America's next president.

I
t is without a shadow doubt this election has been one of the most vitriolic, negative and perhaps worst display of electoral politics in recent American history.

A
mericans will vote on 8 November to decide who will be the country's next president to lead the nation to a peaceful path without wars and bloodbaths. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have presented a crude irony to the poll that American people have been provided with a choice between not only the two most unpopular candidates, but also the two most reactionary candidates in modern history.

A
part from the major issues that have been discussed by the Presidential candidates, there are a few foreign policy issues which have not been discussed. At least they were not discussed with the intensity with which they should have been done.

Page 8 of 20

ABOUT MD

Modern Diplomacy is an invaluable platform for assessing and evaluating complex international issues that are often outside the boundaries of mainstream Western media and academia. We provide impartial and unbiased qualitative analysis in the form of political commentary, policy inquiry, in-depth interviews, special reports, and commissioned research.

 

MD Newsletter

 
Top