I
n a continuation of the theater of the absurd, all 100 U.S. senators were driven to the White House to listen to a top-secret intelligence briefing on North Korea. North Korea now has missiles capable of reaching Hawaii and will soon be able to extend its reach to California.

A
pril 28th will be a date to remember. Even though some of the great media claim that there were only demonstrations around the country, it is to assume that, by a consensus or not, what happened here was a strike. A general strike, the first in 20 years, one of the biggest in the History of the country, highly cited in the social media (figuring the trending topics in the whole world for hours), spread over the 26 states and the Federal District.

D
onald Trump and his deep love for America has not changed since he became President of the United States, only his knowledge and access to national security intelligence and information has.

H
ow many books have been authored by Donald Trump? The answer: a steady stream totaling a whopping 17 -- more than enough to keep a full-time writer fully occupied without all of Mr. Trump's other activities. The word 'writer' of course is key, for Mr. Trump has not actually written any of them. He hires a ghost writer and simply pens his name to the finished product.

D
r. Matthew Crosston is Vice Chairman at ModernDiplomacy.eu and Editor-in-Chief of the Global South policy initiative, Journal of Rising Powers.

This is an effort by the Obama administration to undermine the Trump administration.”-Kentucky Republican Thomas Massie “We’re up against a permanent bureaucratic structure defending itself and quite willing to break the law to do so” -Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich “The Deep State that we talk about, they’re out for blood.”-Sean Hannity

L
ately we’ve heard much about “Deep State” in the media, even in this very magazine. It seems to be a rather popular conspiracy theory among assorted supporters of President Trump.

T
here is more repression of individual freedom here that in any other country we’ve been to, the police patrol the streets carrying rifles and demand your papers every few minutes, which some of them read upside down. The atmosphere is tense and it seems a revolution may be brewing. The countryside is in open revolt and the army is powerless to suppress it.” A young Ernesto Che Guevara was travelling around South America and, in a letter to his mother – dated June 1952 -, used these words to describe Colombian state during La Violencia (1948-1958).

T
he past few days have been full of so-called coincidences in the Middle East that can’t help but to raise eyebrows in the post-Iraq War era. On Tuesday, “a suspected chemical attack by government forces” took place in Idlib, one of the few major cities still under rebel control in President Assad’s Syrian Arab Republic. Two days later, the US launched 59 Tomahawk missiles at a government air base near Homs, right as President Trump was in the middle of a delicate dinner conversation with his nemesis (and Assad ally) Chinese Premier Xi.

E
ver since Trump assumed office at White House, rumors have been spinning about possible meeting between Presidents of America and China even before Trump would be able to meet his favourite leader Russian president Putin. But Trump gave preference to Israeli leaders ahead of both for a face to face meeting soon.

A
new book by the Yale University Press has just been published. Its title is The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age. The author is James Kirchick, a Yale University alumnus, journalist and foreign correspondent, recipient of the Journalist of the Year Award, conservative leaning politically, who however supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential elections branding Donald Trump as a “brashly authoritarian populist.”

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