T
he past few days have been full of so-called coincidences in the Middle East that can’t help but to raise eyebrows in the post-Iraq War era. On Tuesday, “a suspected chemical attack by government forces” took place in Idlib, one of the few major cities still under rebel control in President Assad’s Syrian Arab Republic. Two days later, the US launched 59 Tomahawk missiles at a government air base near Homs, right as President Trump was in the middle of a delicate dinner conversation with his nemesis (and Assad ally) Chinese Premier Xi.

E
ver since Trump assumed office at White House, rumors have been spinning about possible meeting between Presidents of America and China even before Trump would be able to meet his favourite leader Russian president Putin. But Trump gave preference to Israeli leaders ahead of both for a face to face meeting soon.

A
new book by the Yale University Press has just been published. Its title is The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age. The author is James Kirchick, a Yale University alumnus, journalist and foreign correspondent, recipient of the Journalist of the Year Award, conservative leaning politically, who however supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential elections branding Donald Trump as a “brashly authoritarian populist.”

T
he incessant drumbeat demonizing Russia has reached a crescendo. Half-truths lead, and outright lies follow. A Congressman on National Public Radio accuses the Russians of interfering in the November election; as a member of the Intelligence Committee, he should know better.

O
n a daily basis, with increasing frequency, the various and individual members and agents of the Deep State are being forced to emerge from the shadows, and reveal themselves, in order to desperately save their New World Order vision.

Falsehood flies, and the Truth comes limping after it, so that when Men come to be undeceiv’d, it is too late; the Jest is over, and the Tale has had its Effect.”--Jonathan Swift “Facts are a stubborn thing”--John Adams “People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole.” --Donald Trump in The Art of the Deal

T
ruthful hyperbole” as defined in the last quote above by Donald Trump may go a long way in explaining, at least partially, why he won the presidency.

W
hat is 'politics' a Senator's quip went ... 'Poli' he said means many in Greek, and 'tics' are bloodsucking parasites. It drew a large laugh not just from the audience and the Supreme Court nominee being questioned by the Senate Judiciary Committee, but the senators themselves.

A
dams: Good morning Thomas. What is your ghost up to, strolling through the streets of Washington DC so early in the morning?

U
nlike US-Japan reactions that have been rather steady notwithstanding some critical issues that began in World war two, US relations with Germany under President Trump have not really taken off. s he wants to dismantle the NATO if the European members refuses to share the finical burden on the North Atlantic military alliance whose main objective to defend against Russian “expansionism” Trump snubbed German Chancellor Angela Merkel by rejecting her desire to have a hand shake with him for photography purposes.

I
n my daily column “The Caligula Presidency,” and elsewhere, I have attempted to delineate the background of Steve Bannon’s egregious conspiracy theories as well as his political convictions. Here, I’d like to further delineate the intellectual profile of the man.

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