W
hat has brought about the most important developments in military doctrines and security and defence policies in recent years? Is it possible to have a constructive dialogue on this topic?

E
mmanuel Macron was elected president of France on May 07 with a business-friendly vision of European integration, defeating Marine Le Pen, a far-right nationalist who threatened to take France out of the European Union (EU) to be the second European nation to be out of EU by following Brexit.

A
few days ago Observer published a column under the title Putin-Proofing the Balkans: A How-To Guide, written by John Schindler. In this article the author advocates some new geopolitical redesigns of the Balkans which are actually far from being a novelty.

W
e all agree that the 2016 American presidential election had a unique style. Not just because of the emotions that surrounded it, but also because, for the first time after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia found itself deeply integrated in the process.

“Who would want to associate oneself with the zone of today’s Europe, where traditional values are destroyed, homosexualism is on the rampage, there is a migration crisis etc. Europe today is, in essence, a dying zone, where the population is unable to defend its cultural and religious identity. It is a post-Christian and post-European world, a graveyard of European civilization.”--Andrei Fursov, Nationalist Russian Historian

T
here is an intriguing phenomenon going on in academic and diplomatic-political circles as we speak, especially those circles who deal with the Russia-EU relationship, détente, the Cold War, the present impasse among the two blocks.

F
or the last few months the western Balkans are back in the newspaper headlines. This is typically not good news. High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy/Vice-President of the European Commission Federica Mogherini paid a four-day visit to the region at the beginning of March, which was followed by a reaffirmation (renewed promise) on March 9th of the EU members that the western Balkans states will eventually join the union.

T
he Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan was illegally occupied by neighboring Armenia during a three-year war that ended with a ceasefire in 1994. The occupied 4,440-square-mile territory – four times the size of Rhode Island – and its Armenian residents are so dependent on Armenia that they use Armenian currency. Much like the ongoing crises in Ukraine and Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh is an example of Russian meddling in the affairs of sovereign, democratic nations. In this case, Russia is trying to tip the scales in favor of its proxy Armenia.

A
strange phenomenon is observable lately among experts on Russia-US relations. There is a trend to explain the various thorny intricacies of such a relationship merely via economic strategies and formulas.

Authors: Rusif Huseynov, Murad Muradov

E
urope`s longest running conflict was reactivated in Nagorno-Karabakh on February 25, when the cease-fire regime along the contact line was violated. The skirmishes lasted several days and left dead corpses behind without producing any other result.

C
rimea was an integral part of Russia for centuries and is historically, culturally and linguistically Russian.

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