Remarks at United Hebrew Congregation, Singapore, 3 October 2017

There are no nice guys in the Middle East, a region that is in the sixth year of transition. It’s a transition that is likely to take up to a quarter of a century. It’s a transition that is being exacerbated by states that are battling either one another for regional hegemony or to maintain an unsustainable status quo or to shape the region in their mould. There are no good or bad guys in this battle, at best there are bad and worse ones.

The Communist Party of China (CPC) - in the phase in which it is governed by Xi Jinping and by Prime Minister Li Kekiang - is changing rapidly. This is a geopolitical and strategic factor of great importance also for Europe and the United States.

The impact of US withdrawal from Paris agreement can be visible in case of Pacific region. It will hamper the efforts of mitigating climate change threats in South East-Asia. The decision of President Trump to withdraw and called this agreement as unjust which is imposing the strict rules and regulations on American workers and the business community.

Even vociferous supporters of the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, including undersigned, no longer have an argument against an outright and blanket ban of any and all automatic weapons from high-population density areas of the United States of America, any longer after the horrific and inexplicable largest mass shooting in U.S. history in Las Vegas during the month of October 2017.

For nearly six decades, Ghana and Russia have had an excellent diplomatic relations and still looking to build a stronger economic cooperation. In this exclusive GNA interview, Ms. Shirley Ayorkor Botwe, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, explains to Kester Kenn Klomegah, the Moscow Bureau Chief, a number of significant corporate projects being undertaken by Russians as well as some aspects of the current economic cooperation between the two countries.

Let me start with a story. In August 2014, I was hired by the Political Science Department at the City University, Mogadishu, Somalia. In their honours curricula, a course titled UNI102: Critical Thinking drew my attention which is taught to their 1st semester students.  I was wondering that if Critical Thinking course is taught in many Universities in the Global South including Somalia, then why not in Bangladesh? Is it less important?

Bangkok - The Thai government is obsessed about Thailand 4.0 - making the Thai economy to become a digital economy. Is this possible? In the past Thailand succeeded in labor intensive manufactured goods against its competitors India, China, Vietnam, and Indonesia. In the future Thailand has to move to higher value-added activities and therefore move up in the global supply chains.

My recent reading of an article detailing the amount of money squandered on the cleanup of the Ganges River prompted me to look into the conundrum. The Ganges is one of the most critical rivers in India – economically and culturally. It begins its journey in the Himalayas and ends up in the Bay of Bengal.

October 2nd is the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, arguably the greatest Indian ever. It is celebrated as International Day of Peace and Non-Violence. The apostle of peace and non-violence is a revered figure universally. How relevant is Gandhi in 2017? Should be generate any interest in the madness surrounding us? The answer is a resounding yes.

Considering the quantity and virulence of the groups taking part in the Syrian war, which has been going on uninterruptedly for six years, in principle there are two possible scenarios. An unstable peace that will disrupt the Syrian political and territorial system - as is currently happening in the Lebanon - or a long war of attrition, as in the Balkans of the 1990s or currently in Ukraine or the Horn of Africa.

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