There will be no bloc of ‘emerging economies’ rising up to challenge the Western order. But what comes next may be more chaotic and dangerous.” ~ Suzanne Nossel, July 6, 2016 Foreign Policy

B
ack in 2008 it was easy to see scholars, analysts, and diplomats all clamoring about the coming global transformation, where American hegemony would be on the wane and ultimately overcome by new powers and new power organizations like BRICS and MINT. That prophecy no longer seems destined for realization.

And yet it also does not signal that American power remains ascendant or that the ‘West’ will remain the cultural and economic hegemon for the entire globe. Back when rising powers were in style, theorists diverged on what to expect from their foreign policies. Some expected the leading democracies to align with Washington, whereas others foresaw a solid political bloc of BRICS-type countries holding Western influence in check. Neither vision came true. This reality is what gave birth to the vision that is the Journal of Rising Powers.

Indeed, if anything, the new geopolitical calculus of global affairs and power positioning is one of constant flux, dynamic interaction, and unreliability. The Journal of Rising Powers was created to dive deep into these processes, revealing the subtle nuances rarely addressed in media and scholarly analyses today. Geographically open and thematically broad, the Journal of Rising Powers is most interested in analyses that are able to document the connective bridges (or failed attempts, as it were) between established powers and rising powers. JRP is also intrigued by the new initiatives, strategies, and policies that potentially challenge the global order and how, conversely, counter-strategies seek to concretize the existing system. As such, JRP will dive across politics, diplomacy, military, science and technology, economic development, foreign policy, and intelligence in each and every issue.

JRP does not represent a chronicle of anti-Americanism or some tired testimony to the ‘rise of the rest.’ Rather, JRP is a pragmatic and realist admission that the world system is, for the foreseeable future, going to remain chaotic, ever-changing, unstable, and ill-defined. But this does not mean our job as analysts is to give up and walk away despondent. Rather, the contributors to JRP believe this chaos gives unique opportunity: it is a chance for new voices and new subjects to emerge center-stage and be given a spotlight that up to now has been too rarely offered.

We are especially pleased that while JRP operates on the standard open, blind, peer-reviewed system common to all academic journals of quality, the editorial team makes every effort to establish contacts with scholarly voices far outside of the traditional Western canon. We believe those voices deserve to be heard and these analyses deserve attention. The frustration that so many writers ‘from the rest’ feel in trying to get published ‘in the West’ is proactively engaged by JRP. Given the plethora of fine writers within the West that also submit to JRP, it means this journal will hopefully be a unique mosaic that represents the best of ‘new research:’ intellectually rigorous, academically relevant, empirically accurate, and policy impactful.  

Dr. Matthew Crosston

Dr. Matthew Crosston is Vice Chairman of Modern Diplomacy and member of the Editorial Board at the International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence.

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