Even before soft power was officially introduced into the vocabulary of international relations, its core principles were nevertheless exercised by state entities all over the world and although formally a new term, it was pragmatically speaking just a fresh term for old practices.

Published in Middle East

Nigerian diplomatic representatives, African researchers, non-governmental organizations, business people from Russia and Nigerian diaspora, local and foreign media representatives participated a one-day round-table discussions under the theme “Perspectives of the Russian-Nigerian relations in the light of the results of the Nigerian presidential election” that was held at the Institute for African Studies in Moscow.

Published in Africa

The country`s power in international relations rests upon various things and the principal distinction into hard and soft power displays particular means to influence the behavior of others.

Published in Diplomacy

There are numerous intellectual sources, from think tanks to governmental agencies, both in the United States and Russia, which are deeply concerned about the state of Russian-American relations.

Published in Diplomacy

Six members of the Elders Group, led by Kofi Annan, took a three-day trip to Moscow to hold a series of private meetings with Russian officials and academics. It was their first visit to Russia as an organization. To conclude this historic trip they met President Putin in his residence in the vicinity of Moscow on April 29.

Published in Russia

This might be a tricky question to ask nowadays, but there are theories that help us understand better the role of emerging powers in the world today. Although are there only relatively simplistic definitions, it is understood that an emerging power is a country whose conquest of space in the international arena occurs gradually, through economic and political means.

Published in International Law

2015 is starting to look and sound and feel an awful lot like 1965. If you find yourself sitting at home wondering how 50 years could go by with so much historical change and global shifting and yet still end up basically back at the starting point of a quasi-Cold War between the United States and Russia, then please allow me to offer one slightly unique explanation as to how this has all come to pass: it’s my fault.

Published in Russia

Stuenkel, Oliver.The BRICS and the Future of Global Order. 1st ed. Lexington Books, 2015. 213pp.

In a world in which there is an ever-growing discourse about a “Post-American/Post-Western World”, a natural interest arises in any government groupings that escape the United States-Europe paradigm, and the BRICS, which is formed by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, are at the centre of this interest. Simply put, the BRICS is a semi-formal bloc that unites countries considered, arguably, rising or emerging powers, in their interest to reorganise the world order in favour of the entire world, and not only of the so-called “Western Powers”, thus enhancing multipolarity.

Published in Diplomacy
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