The Nano- Diplomacy as a Success of Holland’s Trade?

In today’s globalized world, the development of nanotechnology being considered as a pivotal gateway to Europe is based on the rational large-scale run and implementation of innovations in nano-based high-tech factories and companies. In previous times, The Netherlands took the all-better round pro-active position in regard to nanotechnologies by inception varied kinds of national programmes focusing on the producing nano-based materials and electronics at the nanoscale.

Today, the Netherlands is one of the nation countries of inventors and entrepreneurs working in the field of nanotechnology. Ostensibly, the growing role and transparent functioning of nanotechnology in the Netherlands leads to immeasurable cross-over scientific solutions to health, security, renewable energy, sustainable mobility, and environmental issues.

It is undeniable fact that in the 21st century, the Netherlands has opted for the strategy of “Economic Diplomacy” in order to advance its economic development and show far more openness to the international marketplace through fostering exporting of nano-based materials and electronics. In today’s industrialized world, how is the “Dutch answer” considered with regard to the development of nanotechnology?! - “The Dutch answer” is to boost the rational manufacturing and transparent exporting of nano-scale materials and services to the international marketplace.

In the Netherlands having large-scale inventiveness, pragmatism and business fortitude, there are a number of nano-related organizations, factories and in particular, newborn companies (namely, Eurekite specialized in the manufacturing of nanofibers) which are committed to facilitating the future growth of nano-scientific innovations that focus on answering the societal, environmental and economic challenges happening in the contemporary world. 

In fact, the large-scale development and productive deployment of nanotechnologies are based on providing the Dutch national interests. Hence, it would be helpful to underline the major role of government, education, specialized institutions, and universities in order to interpret the causes of economic and societal development in depth. First and foremost, the prevailing role and interest of government influence the progress of major companies and factories in Holland. Because of the fact that the government (in particular, The Ministry of Foreign Affairs) supports the nano-related factories and start-up companies (for instance, Eurekite) which are dealing with the implementation of innovative projects and models through innovation credit, grants, and tax benefits. For example, the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs financially supports NanoNed Company.  From the prism of the maintenance of national interests, government as a basis of the Economic Diplomacy” also invests in national companies in order to not only does promote and represent their innovative breakthroughs on a foreign marketplace with the representation of “industrial attachés” but also provide the sufficient development of national economy.

It is unquestionable fact that to encourage the innovative breakthroughs not only does increase the economic growth, in particular, create the opportunities to new employment areas but also strive to mitigate varied kind of problems and find out solutions to the pivotal societal issues in regard to global food security, healthy life, ageing populations, and other kinds of related issues.

For instance, the Dutch government held the “National Icons” competition in order to select the far more innovative and cutting-edge projects and models of ambiguous entrepreneurs as winners of the competition. On the other hand, there is a huge golden “triadic nexus” in the Netherlands in the field of nanotechnology, government, universities and social entrepreneurs that fertile the soil for the targeted innovation. In essence, they work closely collectively within the atmospheric research of the Dutch chemical industry and strive to foster cooperation to keep the chemical industry much more competitive and drive the national prosperity in the future.  

One of the main causes of the economic effect is the Dutch Education. Education plays a pivotal role in the teaching of entrepreneurial skills, nanotech advancements, the fabrication of nanomaterials, and the development of innovative projects and models. Thus, the Dutch government sets up close relations with the universities. For instance, the University of Twente supported by MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology is one of the biggest universities in the field of nano-based materials and innovations. 

In this regard, the Dutch government ensures financial support for promising students who are able to make technologically new innovations. For instance, Bahruz Mammadov from Azerbaijan was pursuing his MSc degree at University of Twente, as a result, he turned his own Master thesis into innovative project and discovered the new-fangled inspirational materials based on the implementation of nanofibers, afterwards, he was awarded the financial support by the Dutch government and founded his own scientific and creative company called Eurekite in Enschede, the Netherlands.  Eventually, the Dutch government closed the gap between education and chemical industries by supporting the scientific innovations of nano-based universities.

Another economic impact of the Nanotechnology is the creation of nano-future markets in   upcoming years in order to enable virtual financial tools (shares and stocks) to be traded with the foreign investors sufficiently. The high-tech factories are capital intensive and devote approximately € 2.5 billion a year in the field of research and development, (R&D) which is nearly 50% of all private R&D in the Netherlands and 10% of the sector’s added value. Furthermore, they have environmental ambitions that the chemical factories will lessen greenhouse gas emissions up to 40% by 2030, compared to the situation in 2005.  The Netherlands also keep the balance of trade with 60% chemical industry made a constructive contribution of nearly €60 billion to the balance of trade in 2012, which was larger than 60% of the total balance of trade of products and services in the Netherlands. According to the report of Statistics Netherlands, the GDP growth rate advanced 0.3 % in 2016 compare to the previous year with 0.2%. 

In conclusion, the positive economic impacts of nanotechnology in the Netherlands are mainly necessary for the future development of Holland trade and “Economic Diplomacy”. Indeed, the development of nanotechnology caused the improvement of the healthy life standards, green growth, productive utilize of renewable energy, agro-food security and smart and sustainable mobility within the Dutch Society. Therefore, nanotechnology is the main provider of economic development and foreign investment in the Dutch trade.

Nargiz Hajiyeva

Nargiz Uzeir Hajiyeva is a policy analyst and independent researcher from Azerbaijan. She holds master degree from Vytautas Magnus University and Institute de Politique de Paris (Science Po). She got bachelor degree with distinction diploma at Baku State University from International Relations and Diplomacy. Her main research fields concern on international security and foreign policy issues, energy security, cultural and political history, global political economy and international public law. She worked as an independent researcher at Corvinus University of Budapest, Cold War History Research Center. She was also a successful participator of International Student Essay Contest, Stimson Institute, on how to prevent the proliferation of the world's most dangerous weapons, by Harvard University, Harvard Kennedy School. She is also an independent researcher and a policy analyst at Observer.ge and Politicon.net platform, and Wikistrat.Between 2014 and 2015, she worked as a Chief Adviser and First Responsible Chairman In International and Legal Affairs at the Executive Power of Ganja. At that time she was defined to the position of Chief Economist at the Heydar Aliyev Center. 

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