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International trade and environment

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To discuss International Trade and Environment is a paradoxical but complementary task.

While environmental issues are constantly being passed over to the detriment of large trade flows among countries, the more the world needs food from unsustainable technologies, which are cheaper to produce, to feed families worldwide. On the other hand, the international community is more aware of its actions and it attempts, through the implementation of standards, to create a fairer trade apparatus among countries and consequently their direct relationship with the environment.

The interconnection between Environment and International Trade can be observed from ancient times, such as in the fifteenth and in the sixteenth centuries, during the exploitation of natural resources from central countries in their respective colonies, when all the raw material was sold generating high profits for these core countries. In the Brazilian case, the exploration of pau-Brasil and henceforth sugar cane was a rather important aid to the constitution of the Portuguese Empire as a great world power of that time. Besides the exploitation of commodities, the world has seen the depletion of non-renewable resources, like coal and oil, in favor of European Industrial Revolutions, more specifically those of England, which had as main objectives to develop national industries and exchange high added value products to the world.

In the 1960s, with the Biosphere Conference, in Paris, the world begins to realize that resources are finite and that there is indivisibility and interdependence between man and nature. It is after this first international reaction that countries began to discuss in a more energetic way the environmental theme.

The term eco-development is coined by Maurice Strong, as a result of the 1972 Conference on Human Development, in Stockholm. For him, the long-term development would only be achieved if the environmental problems at that time were solved. The world was then divided between the more and the less developed countries, which had contrasting national interests, such as development. Issues that are observed currently it actually started to rise by then: while some want to maintain their natural resources (developed countries), others need it to develop themselves (developing countries), since the exploitation of resources was needed for national development. This is the beginning of the developmental dilemma between actors belonging to opposite ends of the international society.

Concurrently with the conference focused on environmental issues, there is the regulation of international trade. In 1947, a set of rules and principles of international trade are compiled in a general agreement called GATT (General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs). The general agreement was essential for international trade, making it fairer and more transparent, replicating the basic principles for all countries of the world as is the case of Art. 24 regarding the principle of most favored nation (if a country offers preference to another, it is obliged to extend the same benefits to all, demonstrating no exclusivity). GATT is still used as the general agreement of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Other elements were incorporated into this agreement as the ones concerning services (GATS), intellectual property (TRIPS) and investment (TRIMS). One can notice that free trade becomes the rule of international trade among countries, whose regulation occurs in the scope of the World Trade Organization.

The WTO is a truly competent body in various branches of international trade, yet it still lacks clarity on certain issues, such as those related to the environment. Agricultural subsidies are still reality in the European Union and in the United States, whose practices end up passing over small farmers of less developed or developing countries, leaving the world increasingly unequal. Sanitary and phytosanitary measures, although prohibited in the Marrakech Agreement (1994), are still practiced by central countries, which use them without any arguments grounded in today’s reality neither based on consistent criteria.

On the other hand, discussions are being held about sustainable trade based on ISO 14000 standards, which are good alternatives for incorporating environmental concerns in international trade. To talk about standardized norms is a weak but an important first step, so that it is possible to give a final end to environmental degradation.

To follow international standards can be quite expensive for a less developed country, so it is believed that the Fair Trade should be increasingly discussed and practiced by the international organizations such as the WTO itself. The third sector is the most active in the dissipation of this practice, in which several NGOs assist small farmers and micro-entrepreneurs to sell their products, which are manufactured in a sustainable manner and without the use of slave labor.

Environment and International Trade are therefore paradoxical but complementary subjects. The trade of commodities in the world depends on the exchange of goods between countries, based on the comparative advantages so to achieve good profits. By focusing on profits, environmental devastation ends up being replicated in order to obtain even greater profits.

The regulation of trade tends not always to the benefit of the weaker, much less to the preservation of the environment. Small producers are harmed by agricultural subsidies and sanitary and phytosanitary barriers conducted by developed countries, making the world increasingly uneven and poor in natural resources. Actions as favoring fair trade and the creation of consistent norms for all producers must be dissipated in the scope of international trade, so that the world becomes even more sustainable and symmetrical. Dialogue, cooperation and some altruism must be practiced to preserve the world in which we all live in.

 

First published on IA-Forum website

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Green Planet

India to host World Environment Day 2018

MD Staff

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Today, Dr. Harsh Vardhan, Minister of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, and Erik Solheim, United Nations Under-Secretary-General and Head of UN Environment, jointly announced that India will be hosting the global World Environment Day celebrations on 5 June 2018.

“Beat Plastic Pollution”, the theme for World Environment 2018, urges governments, industry, communities, and individuals to come together and explore sustainable alternatives and urgently reduce the production and excessive use of single-use plastic polluting our oceans, damaging marine life and threatening human health.

“India is excited to host the World Environment Day this year on June 5. Indian philosophy and lifestyle has long been rooted in the concept of co-existence with nature. We are committed to making Planet Earth a cleaner and greener place”, said Dr. Harsh Vardhan.

He added: “If each and every one of us does at least one green good deed daily towards our Green Social Responsibility, there will be billions of green good deeds daily on the planet.”

The Government of India has committed to organizing and promoting the World Environment Day celebrations through a series of engaging activities and events generating strong public interest and participation. From pan-Indian plastic clean-up drives in public areas, national reserves and forests to simultaneous beach clean-up activities – India will lead the initiative by setting an example.

“India will be a great global host of 2018’s World Environment Day celebrations,” said Erik Solheim at the announcement on Monday.

He added: “The country has demonstrated tremendous global leadership on climate change and the need to shift to a low carbon economy, and India will now help galvanize greater action on plastics pollution. It’s a global emergency affecting every aspect of our lives. It’s in the water we drink and the food we eat. It’s destroying our beaches and oceans. India will now be leading the push to save our oceans and planet.”

India is emerging as a leader, given it has one of the highest recycling rates in the world. It can be instrumental in combating plastic pollution. By hosting World Environment Day 2018, the Indian government is accelerating its leadership on an issue of tremendous magnitude.

World Environment Day is a UN Environment-led global event, the single largest celebration of our environment each year, which takes place on June 5 and is celebrated by thousands of communities worldwide.

Since it began in 1972, it has grown to become a global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated across the globe.

Most of all, World Environment Day is a day of everyone around the world to take ownership of their environment and to actively engage in the protection of our earth.

Plastic Pollution facts:

  • Every year the world uses 500 billion plastic bags
  • Each year, at least 8 million tonnes of plastic end up in the oceans, the equivalent of a full garbage truck every minute.
  • In the last decade, we produced more plastic than in the whole last century
  • 50 percent of the plastic we use is single-use or disposable
  • We buy 1 million plastic bottles every minute
  • Plastic makes up 10% of all of the waste we generate

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Coral reefs: We continue to take more than we give

MD Staff

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Maaenboodhoo, Maldives Photo by Ishan @seefromthesky on Unsplash

Figures released today on international financial support being given to protect and sustainably manage the world’s coral reefs reveal funding contributions are not only inadequate, but disproportionate to how much the fragile ecosystems offer humans in food, livelihoods, medicine and environmental protection.

Coral reef ecosystems provide society with resources and services worth $375 billion per year. They house 25 percent of all marine life, feeding hundreds of millions of people; they enable discovery of new pharmaceuticals and provide work and income through the tourism and fisheries industries.

Yet we have lost at least one fifth of the world’s coral reefs, with some estimates placing the loss of live coral as high as 50 per cent. These vital ecosystems are being rapidly degraded as a result of warming sea temperatures due to climate change, overfishing, destructive fishing, ocean acidification, and a range of land-based activities. A recent study in the Asia-Pacific region also found that coral reefs are contaminated by 11 billion pieces of plastic, which are leading to coral disease.

The coral reef funding analysis, conducted by UN Environment, the International Coral Reef Initiative and the UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre, found that in the 83 countries surveyed, there was an increase in funding between 2010 and 2016 in response to global and regional policy commitments on environmental management and protection, but that the more than $1.9 billion currently being invested is not commensurate with the economic and social gains we make from coral reefs.

The value of a single hectare of coral reef in terms of tourism, shoreline protection and fisheries is, on average, $130,000 per year, and as much as $1.25 million where the tourism sector is large. Travel and tourism, much of it dependent on reefs, contribute a third of the GDP in the Caribbean for example, and as much as 80 percent in the Maldives.

Coastal fisheries supported by coral reefs contribute to food security of hundreds of millions of coastal dwellers, providing 70 per cent of the dietary protein of Pacific islanders. Coral reef organisms are a source of many medicines, such as antiviral drugs and the anticancer agent Ara-C used in chemotherapy for leukemia and lymphoma.

The analysis reveals annual investment in maintaining healthy reefs through overseas development assistance is only 0.07 percent of the value of the societal benefits we draw from them. And of this investment, the majority of funding for work related to coral reefs and associated ecosystems is driven by a small number of funders, with nearly three-quarters of all projects consisting of small-scale initiatives.

Funded projects for coral reefs and associated ecosystems were identified in a total of 83 countries and territories, out of more than 100 countries and territories where tropical corals are known to exist. Some countries with a large coral reef area were found to be receiving comparatively low amounts of donor funding per unit area of reef. Out of the 314 projects surveyed, 279 focused on a single country – Tuvalu.

Funding is essential for sustainable management of coral reefs and associated ecosystems worldwide. But greater consideration of these ecosystems as blue economy assets is required, both in the public and private sector, to enable more and more diverse investment, and in the longer term reduce reliance on donor funding.

“If greater action is not taken today, the planet could lose its live coral reefs and with them a large number of the world’s marine species by 2050,” said Gabriel Grimsditch of UN Environment’s Marine and Coastal Ecosystems Branch.

“The necessary change will only be possible when mindsets change, in the general public, among financial decision makers, and also in the environment sector.”

The Funding Analysis was conducted by UN Environment, the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) and the UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre, and was funded by the Government of France.

2018: The International Year of the Reef

The International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) has declared 2018 the International Year of the Reef. UN Environment together with partner organizations is helping to drive a worldwide campaign to raise awareness about the value and importance of coral reefs and threats to their sustainability, and to motivate people to take action to protect them. All individuals, corporations, schools, governments, and organizations are welcome and actively encouraged to participate in IYOR 2018.

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Sustainable Yemen programme recycles waste as school materials

MD Staff

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© Yemeni National Commission for UNESCO/sub-unit in Hodeidah City

An innovative project recycling and transforming waste into educational tools and art forms is one of many sustainable development schemes coordinated by the local sub-unit of the Yemeni National Commission for UNESCO.

The sub-unit, based in the province of Hodeidah with work extending to neighbouring areas, acts to coordinate and implement the multiple activities of projects on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). It brings together educational, civil and private sector organizations to mobilize communities towards achieving the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and improving their own environment.

Since 2012, the initiative’s successes include training 60 teachers on the UNESCO course “Education and Learning for a Sustainable Future” and training 320 youth on project management and marketing. It has also established a youth foundation and community college and organized training of trainers.

Project Manager Faisal Ali Ayed said: “The Hodeidah work is particularly important because it is the first project in Yemen that has succeeded in using ESD in a context of large population density and a high percentage of youth facing the multiple challenges of poverty and unemployment.”

Other innovations include using teachers for e-learning, setting up of electronic libraries and collecting funds for poor students to provide breakfast, school meals, school uniform and school bags. Alongside these are awareness campaigns offering information and advice around healthy balanced food, early marriage and HIV/AIDS.

Sustainable development clubs have also been established in some schools to promote community activities related to all dimensions of sustainable development (environmental, social and economic).​

Mr Ayed explained why the work had been so successful. “The project has a really dedicated team and collaborating partners. For that reason, the project has achieved real transformation in practices in schools and community and at the same time has received huge media attention so the impact is spread.”

For the future, there are plans to expand the implementation of ESD projects, increase the number of the beneficiaries of educational institutions, in particular youth and women, spread the work to the neighbouring provinces of Hajjah and Rimah where six major projects will be implemented to train school principals, teacher trainers, educators, women and young people on ESD.

An important aspect of the work is enabling young people and women to enter or re-enter the labour market. So far, 920 youth and women have received life and professional skills training and help on integration into the labour market.

“The project has contributed to empowering women to participate in community development as well as changing society’s vision of the role of women and enabling the acceptance of different roles for women in society,” said Mr Ayed.

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